Picture scroll depicting traditional construction methods in Japan. All rights are owned by Hofu Tenmangu Shrine, Japan.

Japanese roots

Values that also lead to success in Europe

With our Japanese roots, Takenaka is unique in the European market for construction and engineering services. We benefit from traditional Japanese values – both within the company and in cooperation with our construction stakeholders. Our ability to both think and act sustainably, to be adaptable, and to be a partner that can be relied upon, has added considerable value to our construction activity in Europe over more than 45 years. We work cooperatively and on the basis of long-term relationships with our customers and service providers. Numerous successfully implemented construction projects for our customers in Europe is a testament to our values and approach.

Japanese roots

Values that also lead to success in Europe

With our Japanese roots, Takenaka is unique in the European market for construction and engineering services. We benefit from traditional Japanese values – both within the company and in cooperation with our construction stakeholders.  Our ability to both think and act sustainably, to be adaptable, and to be a partner that can be relied upon, has added considerable value to our construction activity in Europe over the last 46 years. We work cooperatively and on the basis of long-term relationships with our customers and service providers. Numerous successfully implemented construction projects for our customers in Europe is a testament to our values and approach.

Shaped by tradition and modernity

The shrine and temple builder Tobei-Masataka Takenaka created the basis of our company in 1610 in Nagoya. Takenaka has been in family hands for over 400 years and is currently in the 17th generation of Toichi Takenaka.

Takenaka is always mindful of its roots.  Adapted and reinterpreted to modern requirements, their legacy persists, and they continue to go from strength to strength. The combination of tradition and modernity runs as a common thread through both the past and present of Takenaka, as is clearly illustrated in the following examples.

In 1984, Takenaka founded the “Takenaka Museum of Woodworking Tools” in Kobe in order to provide future generations with insight into the tools used for working with wood, complex wood construction techniques and their rich tradition in Japan. The museum concept brings the craftsmanship of carpenters and woodworkers together with the engineering sciences of civil engineers and architects. With the museum and its associated activities, Takenaka is preserving an important cultural heritage for the future. In 1984, the museum moved into a modern new building constructed in wood.

WE HAVE BUILT LANDMARKS IN EUROPE SINCE 1973

Buildings that are now considered landmarks

Since its foundation, Takenaka has made a valuable contribution to society with innovative buildings that are now considered to be landmarks.  These include the 1874 Nagoya Garrison, constructed in Western style, as well as the Tokyo Tower.  At 333 metres high, the Tokyo Tower in 1958 was the tallest building in Tokyo, the tallest television tower and one of the tallest self-supporting steel towers in the world. Even today it continues to attract about 3 million visitors a year.

To mark the 200th anniversary, Takenaka built the Suitengu Shrine anew. Traditionally constructed out of wood using the “Base Isolation System” for earthquake safety, the building emphasizes brightness and light. The waiting room and the meeting hall are both built in a modern style, and for this reason the shrine is seen as a successful example of the Takenaka combination of tradition and modernity.

Buildings that are now considered landmarks

Since its foundation, Takenaka has made a valuable contribution to society with innovative buildings that are now considered to be landmarks.  These include the 1874 Nagoya Garrison, constructed in Western style, as well as the Tokyo Tower.  At 333 metres high, the Tokyo Tower in 1958 was the tallest building in Tokyo, the tallest television tower and one of the tallest self-supporting steel towers in the world. Even today it continues to attract about 3 million visitors a year.

To mark the 200th anniversary, Takenaka built the Suitengu Shrine anew. Traditionally constructed out of wood using the “Base Isolation System” for earthquake safety, the building emphasizes brightness and light. The waiting room and the meeting hall are both built in a modern style, and for this reason the shrine is seen as a successful example of the Takenaka combination of tradition and modernity.

Research and Development

sustainable solutions

Takenaka has the world’s largest state-of-the-art Institute for Research and Development. This is where future-proof technologies are created to meet the increasingly complex requirements of modern buildings.

The Takenaka Institute for Research and Development was founded in Chiba in 1993 and built upon the research that was carried out in Osaka and Tokyo from 1953. Since the merger of the two research units in 1993, around 200 specialists have been working in Chiba. They carry out development, research and testing in the fields of energy efficiency, materials technology, and construction technology.

Shimadzu Germany

Researching and developing

sustainable solutions

Takenaka has the world’s largest state-of-the-art Institute for Research and Development. This is where future-proof technologies are created to meet the increasingly complex requirements of modern buildings.

The Takenaka Institute for Research and Development was founded in Chiba in 1993 and built upon the research that was carried out in Osaka and Tokyo from 1953. Since the merger of the two research units in 1993, around 200 specialists have been working in Chiba. They carry out development, research and testing in the fields of energy efficiency, materials technology, and construction technology.

Shimadzu Germany

Our history

Milestones since 1610

Our history

Milestones since 1610

Abeno Harukas

300m master craftsmanship

A multi-faceted building, 300 metres high and therefore the tallest building in Japan, built in the city of Osaka in a 4-year timeframe, whilst a department store and railway station remained in operation. These facts alone indicate that Abeno Harukas is a high-rise building of which we can be particularly proud.

The starting point was the existing train station with an integrated department store, which remained in operation during the transition. This was supplemented by office space, a hotel, restaurant, museum, school, clinic, and to cap it all, a viewing platform on floors 58-60 of the new high-rise building.

INNOVATION THAT STANDS UP TO NATURE

During the planning and construction of the building, we were able to put into practice numerous innovations and accomplishments originating from our research unit in Chiba. In a country like Japan, when a building of this size is put in place, it is essential to expect and prepare accordingly for earthquakes and similar natural phenomena. Abeno Harukas has been designed to withstand a major earthquake, the like of which occurs about every 500 years. The building has also been designed to withstand strong winds such as typhoons, which are not uncommon in East Asia. The shape of the building itself, as well as its swing brake system, helps in these extreme situations. Our constant research on sustainability has of course also been applied here: surplus heat generated by the shopping centre’s air conditioning systems is in turn used to heat water for the hotel, while the waste collected from the hotel and restaurant contributes to the generation of electricity through biogas. Last but not least, our goal is to reduce energy consumption while maintaining a high degree of comfort.

We bring the necessary creativity and expertise to transform your dreams of today into the reality of the future!

Abeno Harukas

300m master craftsmanship

A multi-faceted building, 300 metres high and therefore the tallest building in Japan, built in the city of Osaka in a 4-year timeframe, whilst a department store and railway station remained in operation. These facts alone indicate that Abeno Harukas is a high-rise building of which we can be particularly proud.

The starting point was the existing train station with an integrated department store, which remained in operation during the transition. This was supplemented by office space, a hotel, restaurant, museum, school, clinic, and to cap it all, a viewing platform on floors 58-60 of the new high-rise building.

INNOVATION THAT STANDS UP TO NATURE

During the planning and construction of the building, we were able to put into practice numerous innovations and accomplishments originating from our research unit in Chiba. In a country like Japan, when a building of this size is put in place, it is essential to expect and prepare accordingly for earthquakes and similar natural phenomena. Abeno Harukas has been designed to withstand a major earthquake, the like of which occurs about every 500 years. The building has also been designed to withstand strong winds such as typhoons, which are not uncommon in East Asia. The shape of the building itself, as well as its swing brake system, helps in these extreme situations. Our constant research on sustainability has of course also been applied here: surplus heat generated by the shopping centre’s air conditioning systems is in turn used to heat water for the hotel, while the waste collected from the hotel and restaurant contributes to the generation of electricity through biogas. Last but not least, our goal is to reduce energy consumption while maintaining a high degree of comfort.

We bring the necessary creativity and expertise to transform your dreams of today into the reality of the future!

Innovative Architecture, high quality execution

Innovative Architecture, high quality execution

You want to build and are looking for the right partner? Contact us!

Innovative Architecture, high quality execution

You want to build and are looking for the right partner? Contact us!